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The Cinema’s debut album takes indie pop to new heights

Kelly Kramer, A&E Manager

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The Cinema, a new band emerging out of indie band Lydia’s Leighton Antelman and music producer Matt Malpass, came out with their first album My Blood is Full of Airplanes on Tuesday, September 13.

The Cinema isn’t really so much of a band as it is a side-project of Antelman’s and Malpass’. The entire album was recorded in a house in the mountains in Colorado, with no real intention to develop as a band.

Their sound has somewhat of an electronic indie-pop feel to it, a refreshing difference to the typical Top 40 radio stations. Every song is incredibly catchy with actual well-thought out lyrics and great vocals without the liberal use of autotune. The level of electronic beats is comparable to Owl City, but with better lyrics, a much more put together sound, and less pushing-buttons-on-the-synthesizer.

With no previous albums as a comparison, one can only really compare it to Lydia’s albums This December, Illuminate, and Assailants. This album is much more upbeat than anything Lydia has done, but still has the same underlying sounds and amazing lyrics as Antelman’s previous work.

It’s nearly impossible to pick a favorite track off this album, but the one that really sticks out is “My Blood is Full of Airplanes.” It’s the softest song on the album, and shows off both the vocal skills of Antelman, but the amazing technical and beat work of Malpass.

My Blood is Full of Airplanes is such a repeat-worthy album. The songs are just catchy enough to not get annoying after about one thousand plays and still have a new sound to them. This album leaves so much to be expected from Antelman and the upcoming album from his main project Lydia.

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The Cinema’s debut album takes indie pop to new heights